Category: 1971

Planet Earth on July 26, 1971, as seen from th…

Planet Earth on July 26, 1971, as seen from the Apollo 15 spacecraft as it zoomed toward the Moon. (Apollo Archive)

Frank Kelly Freas art on the cover of Analog S…

Frank Kelly Freas art on the cover of Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, March 1971.

Earth’s crest over the lunar horizon, ph…

Earth’s crest over the lunar horizon, photographed during the Apollo 15 mission, 1971.

The training version of the Apollo 16 lunar ro…

The training version of the Apollo 16 lunar rover, 16 March 1971. (NASA)

Bruce Pennington cover art for Space, Time and…

Bruce Pennington cover art for Space, Time and Nathaniel by Brian Aldiss, 1971.

Johnson Space Center, Houston, February 18, 19…

Johnson Space Center, Houston, February 18, 1971. Glove handlers work with freshly opened lunar samples brought back from the Apollo 14 mission to the Moon. The powdery substance was part of 90-some pounds of material brought back to Earth aboard the Apollo 14 spacecraft. (NASA)

TODAY IN HISTORY: Apollo 14 astronauts Stu Roo…

TODAY IN HISTORY: Apollo 14 astronauts Stu Roosa, Ed Mitchell, and Alan Shepard, left to right, emerge from the recovery helicopter and wave to the waiting crew of USS New Orleans, 9 February 1971. (NASA)

February 9, 1971 – Apollo 14 astronauts Stu Ro…

February 9, 1971 – Apollo 14 astronauts Stu Roosa, Alan Shepard, and Ed Mitchell splash down into a vast ocean. A U.S. Navy helicopter drops frogmen into the water to assist the spacemen out of the capsule and then up in a hoist to the helicopter, which then flies the tired astronauts to the USS New Orleansrecovery ship. Easy-peasy. Anyone can do it.

(NASA)

February 9, 1971 – A U.S. Navy helicopter scoo…

February 9, 1971 – A U.S. Navy helicopter scoops up Apollo 14 astronaut Stu Roosa after he splashed down in the Pacific Ocean along with moonwalkers Ed Mitchell and Alan Shepard. (NASA)

February 5, 1971 – Apollo 14 astronaut Alan Sh…

February 5, 1971 – Apollo 14 astronaut Alan Shepard snaps photos of the lunar module during a pan of the surface of the Moon.

(NASA)