Category: camera

BIG-ASS SPACE CAMERA: Astronaut David Hilmers …

BIG-ASS SPACE CAMERA: Astronaut David Hilmers with the large-format AERO LINHOF camera on the Space Shuttle Atlantis, March 3, 1990. (NASA)

TODAY IN HISTORY: Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin train…

TODAY IN HISTORY: Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin trains to be the first human in space, February 18, 1960.

DATA ACQUISITION CAMERA – 16mm film camera use…

DATA ACQUISITION CAMERA – 16mm film camera used during the Apollo 12 mission in November 1969, both inside the lunar module and on the surface of the Moon. It was mounted in a window of the lunar module to record the astronauts’ activities on the lunar surface. (Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum)

You wouldn’t happen to have any Kodak disc film lying around, would you?

Not unused, no. I may have one disc that has been used, but somehow I haven’t come across that many negatives. Disc cameras, all the time, they were quite popular, but the disc negatives I see rarely.

The Handle 2 camera, another doomed Kodak instant, 1979.

The Handle 2 camera, another doomed Kodak instant, 1979.

This 1970s Synchronex Super 8 movie camera once belonged to my…

This 1970s Synchronex Super 8 movie camera once belonged to my grandfather. It still works, and I recently used it to shoot some film. It came with this cassette deck that recorded audio synchronized with the picture. The cassette would then be sent in with the film for processing, and the audio track would be copied onto a magnetic strip at the edge of the film. Unfortunately, no film-processing company still offers this service. It’s still a good Super 8 camera though!

That’s a pretty cool (if convoluted) way of getting the audio track on an 8mm film, but this would allow better miking/recording of the audio than relying on the condenser microphone or ‘overhead’ small boom microphone other movie cameras had next to the lens.

profoundlydopenightmare: Don’t know how often you get…

profoundlydopenightmare:

Don’t know how often you get this type of old camera but here’s some old tech 

Nice case, and good to see the paperwork and flash! The Polaroid 220 was manufactured from 1968 to 1970, and was special because you could switch the aperature to shoot ISO 3000 black-and-white film without a flash.

Your blog inspired me to dig out this old brick. It’s a Kodak…

Your blog inspired me to dig out this old brick. It’s a Kodak EK160-EF instant camera. Not sure when they were made but they were discontinued in January 1986 after Polaroid filed a lawsuit over what they said was a patent infringement (something to do with the chemical formula of the photo paper?) It seems to be impossible to find the film for it these days, so sadly I can’t use it, but it’s nice to keep around.

Very nice camera, and thank you for sharing it! Yes, you know enough of the story, that Polaroid sued Kodak over them getting into the instant photography market, after years in court Kodak lost, and as a result Kodak instants became neigh unto useless because they couldn’t produce film.

And your camera premiered in the middle of 1979 aka the Colorburst 250.

Camera collection at the hobby hall at the Fair.

Camera collection at the hobby hall at the Fair.

Old Polaroid I had lying around. Unsure of the year, but the…

Old Polaroid I had lying around. Unsure of the year, but the camera itself is in mint condition.
It even has the original plastic film on the glossy bits to protect it from scratches and what-not.

(Almost) Never used? Good that you can get film for it again… 🙂