Category: nypl

Partial eclipse of the Moon, observed on October 24, 1874, illustrated by Étienne Léopold Trouvelot, courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Reminds me of George Carlin’s routine about stuff.

(New York Public Library)

“The planet Jupiter. Observed November 1, 1880, at 9h. 30m. P.M.” Illustration by Étienne Léopold Trouvelot. (New York Public Library)

(New York Public Library)

Child in a Planet of the Apes costume for Halloween, New York, circa 1974-1978, photo by Larry Racioppo. (New York Public LIbrary)

Child in a Planet of the Apes costume for Halloween, New York, circa 1974-1978, photo by Larry Racioppo. (New York Public LIbrary)

Woman pressing button at the General Electric X-ray mummy exhibit at the New York World’s Fair, 1939/1940.

(New York Public Library)

Sara woman with labrets, circa 1931, from Dark Continent: Africa, The Landscape, and The People by Hugo Adolf Bernatzik. The Sara people live in southern Chad and the Central African Republic. (New York Public Library)

“In summer the earth is nearer the sun than in winter.” Science fun facts on a vintage cigarette card. Via New York Public Library.

April 28, 1503. Guns beat steel at the Battle of Cerignola: During the Second Italian War, the imperial armies of France and Spain were battling for supremacy on the Italian peninsula. When they met at the town of Cerignola in southern Italy, the forces of Spain, under the command of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba, were outnumbered by the French and their pike-wielding Swiss mercenary friends. But the Spanish had something going for them: 1,000 well-positioned arquebusiers, aka guys with guns. French heavy cavalry, backed up by the Swiss pikemen, did what European armies had done for decades–they charged. Hundreds of French soldiers, including their leader Louis d’Armagnac, Duke of Nemours, were cut down by the Spanish fusillade, again and again. The Battle of Cerignola was a game-changer in the history of warfare, considered first big European battle won mostly through the use of small arms. And the Duke of Nemours possibly has the dubious distinction of being the first general to be gunned down in combat. Live by the sword, die by small arms fire.

(Illustrations from the New York Public Library)