Category: science

Glorious planet Saturn, observed by the Voyage…

Glorious planet Saturn, observed by the Voyager 2 space probe on August 19, 1981. (NASA)

August 19, 2007: Backdropped by the Earth, the…

August 19, 2007: Backdropped by the Earth, the International Space Station is seen receding into the distance as the Space Shuttle Endeavour departs the orbital outpost.

(NASA)

Vintage NASA press pic of Saturn’s northern he…

Vintage NASA press pic of Saturn’s northern hemisphere, observed by the Voyager 2 probe from 4.4 million miles away, August 19, 1981.

Inside Firing Room #3 at Cape Canaveral, 2008,…

Inside Firing Room #3 at Cape Canaveral, 2008, photographed by Penny Rogo Bailes.

The Space Shuttle Columbia blasts off from Cap…

The Space Shuttle Columbia blasts off from Cape Canaveral, March 22, 1982.

TODAY IN HISTORY: Soviet space dogs Belka and …

TODAY IN HISTORY: Soviet space dogs Belka and Strelka became the first canines to fly in space and return safely to Earth, August 19, 1960.

Astronaut Tom Marshburn reflected in the visor…

Astronaut Tom Marshburn reflected in the visor of spaceman Christopher Cassidy, July 2009.

(NASA)

August 18, 1967: Crater Aristarchus on the Moo…

August 18, 1967: Crater Aristarchus on the Moon is observed by NASA’s Lunar Orbiter 5 probe.

(NASA)

August 18, 1973 – Astronaut Alan Bean takes fl…

August 18, 1973 – Astronaut Alan Bean takes flight as he tests the Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU) in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop on the Skylab space station. The dome area is 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet in height. (NASA)

August 18, 1783: A meteor passes over the pala…

August 18, 1783: A meteor passes over the palatial grounds of Windsor Castle, England. Pencil and watercolor illustration by Paul Sandby (1731-1809). Dr. Tiberius Cavallo witnessed the event: “Being upon the Castle Terrace at Windsor, in company with my friend Dr James Lind, Dr Lockman, Mr T. Sandby and a few other persons, we observed a very extraordinary meteor in the sky. Mr Sandby’s watch was seventeen minutes past nine nearest; it does not mark seconds.”

(Royal Collection Trust)